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Valid Software Update Screen Shots

Most of the software that you use day-to-day has some kind of automatic update feature.  You will be prompted to install the latest update for Java or Adobe Acrobat.  The problem is that mal-ware authors are getting more adept at creating software that looks legitimate, but is not.  So, how do you know what is a legitimate pop-up that asks you to install an update versus one that will install software that will harm your computer?  How do you know if an anti-virus warning is legitimate or not?

Below you will find a number of screen shots of the most popular software's update message.  These will change over time as new versions come out, but it will give you an idea of the difference between a real update or warning and a fake one.  All of the screens below are legitimate and if you see them, you can safely run them.  If you are ever unsure about running an update or seeing a warning message, please contact the Ag Help Desk (540-231-4865).

 

   

Windows XP Update Bubble Windows XP Update Notifier

   

Windows Vista Update Windows Vista Update Notifier

 

   

Symantec AntiVirus v.10 Virus Warning Symantec AntiVirus v.10 Virus Warning

   

Symantec Endpoint Protection v.11 Virus Warning Symantec Endpoint Protection v.11 Virus Warning

 

   

Adobe Flash Update Notifier Adobe Flash Update Notifier

   

Adobe Acrobat Update Screen Adobe Acrobat Update Notifier

   

Java Update Notifier Java Update Notifier

   

QuickTime Update Notifier QuickTime Update Notifier

   

Firefox Update Notifier Firefox Update Notifier

   

Firefox Add-Ons Update Notifier Firefox Add-Ons Update Notifier

 

   

Exchange Mailbox Full Message This is the valid "Full Mailbox" message that you could receive from the mail server. Notice that there are no links to click on, and no passwords requested. It only states your limits and to delete messages.